Learning Activites · Mandatory Assignments

Week 1: Moodle Map

“Anyone who stops learning is old, whether at twenty or eighty. Anyone who keeps learning stays young.” – Henry Ford

One of our first assignments was to draw a map of Moodle, the learning platform we use online. Moodle is quite extensive; there is a lot of content and it’s not always that easy to navigate. I am a huge fan of trying to narrow information down to the tidbits that are important for myself to remember, and a principle I ended up applying to this assignment as well.

Screenshot of Moodle's features. Narrowing down which features to include was a difficult task.
Screenshot of Moodle’s features. Narrowing down which features to include was a difficult task.

Therefore, the first thing I did was to make a list on my computer on the features included in the version of Moodle available for us to use. I then narrowed it down to a selected 10 features which I myself find important for me as a participant in the course, eight of which I would end up using. This is, of course, only a fraction of what is available and many may perhaps have different views on what should have been included.

Since I have a background in Japanese studies I decided to make my map into a Japanese character – the kanji for learning, 学. This kanji consists of 8 strokes, or lines, in total, hence the number of eight keywords included in the map. Memorizing each stroke and the order of these are both important in studying Japanese, and by replacing each stroke with a Moodle feature, I feel that I will be able to memorize these as well.

Sketched up the kanji, and then did some quick sketches of where the words would align to make up the lines.
Sketched up the kanji, and then did some quick sketches of where the words would align to make up the lines.

At first I wanted to try a coloured and clean version.

Coloured and poorly "scanned" version (by a smartphone)
Coloured and poorly “scanned” draft (by a smartphone)

Even though I sort of like it simple and clean, this turned out to be too simple, so I scrapped the idea of colour and instead went with a scroll concept, in which I imagined the kanji presented and explained – the kanji being the actual map. As mentioned, I dropped the colour and went with grayscale, as scrolls usually have that “old” feel.

The delivered product.
The delivered product.

In retrospect I could have switched out the elements at the bottom end of the map to include Moodle features as well. Nevertheless, it was a fun task to complete! I still have a long way to go, but it was nice thinking outside the box with no limits, despite it being difficult for someone who has no previous experience with anything related to graphics except some occasional drawing every now and then.

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